Writers Stink at Social Media (And Why That’s Bad if You’re Self-Publishing)

socialmediaandwritersI’ve talked about how bad writers can be at Facebook before. It’s pretty obvious if you just take a look around.

There are exceptions to the rule, of course, but in general it seems that us writerly folks tend to not like social media that much, particularly the insta-smile networks of Facebook, Twitter, and their even more photo-oriented ilk.

The reason is simple:

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Is the Final Draft Dead?

contentmarketingblogging2I wrote a lot of this in my car, because I have a smartphone, so now I can talk sternly to it and, magically, those incantations are turned into text.

I’ve tried this method to write blog posts before, but it never quite works because swerving through rush hour traffic isn’t the most conducive environment for good writing. If you can call speaking into a phone “writing.”

But this is my experiment, because I recently read a blog post proclaiming that the “days of working on a blog post in drafts for the last week” are now dead.

That’s right. The final draft is dead. So what does that mean?

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How One Author Makes Facebook Work

facebookmarketingforwriters

Facebook has been something of a Rubik’s Cube for authors. Even if you take a look at some of the most famous authors’ Facebook Pages, you can tell that the teams pulling the strings have a pretty poor understanding of how it all works.

In my quest for authors who use Facebook effectively, I first came across the Facebook Page of E.L James, the author of Fifty Shades of Grey, and talked about why that Facebook Page worked.

But now, I’ve finally found Inglath Cooper, who has over 18,000 Likes and a really active fan engagement.

What’s her secret?

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Why All Writers Have to Love Technology

writerstechnologyThe other day, I got in an argument with my friend over a recent article about what a few start-ups were doing to nonfiction books.

Well, “argument” is being generous. More like four exhaustive Facebook posts written by two tired people who have the same opinion about things, but disagree to pass the time.

Anyway, my friend’s position was simple: the innovations by the start-ups were bad for literature, bad for readers, and, really… just bad.

My position was that the innovations were good. Because technology is good for books. I think it could usher in a Golden Age of Creativity if everyone stops crying about it.

Here’s what the start-ups were trying to do:

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How to Set Up Google Authorship on WordPress… and Why All Writers & Bloggers Need It

Don’t feel like you’re out-of-the-loop if you haven’t heard of Google+ — practically no one uses it.

Sure, there are some reports about a surge of users for Google’s social network, but that’s mostly people who have been tricked into using it by accidentally clicking the wrong button on YouTube or Gmail.

The average Google+ user spends 12 minutes a month on the site.

Google knows that, but they’ve found a new way to get people to use Google+.

This year, Google is going to create a whole new kind of category: social search.

That means if you’re a writer or a blogger without a Google+ profile, your stuff will never, ever, show up in Google’s results. Ever.

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Print Books Aren’t Dying, But They’re Definitely Changing

printbooksalesIt’s a new year. We’re humans, so we love the endless art of speculation.

If you’re a writer, an avid reader, or both, there’s probably one big question on your mind in particular: are print books going to stick around or are eBooks going to replace them?

What’s a bookshelf going to look like in the next few years?

Well, the data is in and the answers may surprise you:

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A New Year’s Resolution for Writers: Don’t Be Snooty

writerspromotingworkAre you, or someone you know, suffering from Snooty Artist Syndrome?

The condition is sweeping the nation. I’ve met quite a few sufferers — and had some personal experience with the dreadful SAS myself.

Writers are suffering in record numbers.

Sure, it can start with the mild panning of ebooks as “not being real books” or the dismissal of crucial self-promotion tools like social media… but soon enough, you’ve developed a full-blown case of Snooty Artist Syndrome and can’t even be “bothered” to maintain a blog.

My resolution for 2013 is to stop suffering from SAS altogether.

If you want to join me, it’s important to first recognize the symptoms.

SAS sufferers often:

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